Best French Fry Cutters for Excellent Classic, Belgian & Other Fries

Everyone who knows anything about potatoes, fried potatoes in particular, knows that most people agree that Belgian fries are the gold crispy delicious standard to beat. Yes, they’re still basically French fries, but it’s the cooking method that makes them superior to others.

So you see, sometimes having the best French fry cutter won’t guarantee you’ll make great fries. There’s still some cooking experience involved, as well as having all the other necessary appliances and ingredients at your disposal.

But I can’t say that a French fry cutter won’t make the experience more enjoyable. Plus, fries just taste better when they’re uniformly shaped. Check out my following picks to see how easy it is to make restaurant-quality fries at home.

10 Best French Fry Cutters for Any Pocket

This heavy-duty unit from Weston is heavy and built like a tank. It’s called restaurant-quality for a reason. You can work it all day long and it won’t show any inconsistencies. The blades can cut through hundreds of potatoes like a hot knife through butter, on a daily basis.

But since this is a manual gadget, it’s unlikely that you’ll be cutting hundreds of potatoes. It’s still nice to know that you can. Either way, this unit is not only very strong and reliable but it’s also affordable.

There are three blade sets included: 1/4", 1/2", and wedge blades. The first two blade sets can help you make classic French fries up to 6” long. The wedge fixture allows you to make six potato wedges out of one potato.

Let’s talk about ease of use. The blades are sharp, so pushing the potatoes through won’t be difficult. Tedious if you’re cooking for 20 people, but not difficult. On top of that, the cutter sits firmly on a kitchen counter thanks to its suction cup feet.

That’s not the main highlight though. The coolest by far is the wall-mounting feature. Each suction cup can be removed and you can use the screws to mount the cutter to your kitchen wall. This lets you save even more space, though it might make cleaning the cutter more difficult.

  • Three blade attachments
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    Heavy-duty build
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    Sharp blades
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    Capable of horizontal and vertical mounting
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    Good value for the money
  • Can’t do curly or crinkle cuts

This potato cutter is a very simple, manually-operated kitchen tool. It has a strong yet light body and uses the classic push-through technique to slice potatoes into thin or thick French fry cuts.

Culina offers two sets of blade grids. One is for 3/8” and one is for 1/4” classic fries. The design features a rounded bottom, which is supposed to offer some extra leverage when pushing potatoes through the blades.

Although it does help, you may still need to shave off a portion of the back of your potato. That will make things even easier. The lever itself is not hard to push down. It offers little resistance even when cutting very green potatoes.

The blades seem strong and sharp enough to also handle sweet potatoes. However, you may need to push a bit harder to get a sweet potato all the way through. Another thing worth noting is that this cutter also has a reliable suction feature.

Thanks to this feature, most potatoes can be pushed through with just one hand on the lever and the other hand in your pocket.

Some may say that this cutter apparatus has a big flaw in that it doesn’t have a tray or bowl attachment to catch the fries. I think that, as long as you keep a clean kitchen board (and you should), there’s no need to worry. It’s not like the fries are ejected from the cutter at the speed of sound and you risk spreading them across the whole kitchen.

  • Affordable
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    Sharp blades
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    Smooth operation
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    Good suction
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    Two French fry blade sets
  • Somewhat flimsy build

One of the most impressive features of this cutter is its capacity. The box that holds the potatoes is large enough to fit a 5.58”x3.51” potato. That’s a lot of room and certainly big enough for homes, restaurants, and fast food places.

The handle is a bit longer than in other similar models. This is a good thing since it can give you some extra leverage when pushing large potatoes. You can, of course, remove the extension at any time if you don’t have enough space to operate.

As far as build quality goes, Sopito did a good job overall. The cutter is sturdy enough to handle continuous use and shows no signs of deformation when pushing through large, tough potatoes. Obviously, this tool can be useful when cutting other vegetables as well, including sweet potatoes, which is always impressive.

There is, however, one minor downside. The Sopito French fry cutter only features a single-blade grid. It cuts potatoes to 1/2" thickness, which is good if you like standard French or Belgium fries. However, if you want to use the 3/8” blade grid, you will have to buy it separately, and it’s not particularly cheap.

  • Affordable1/2" blade grid
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    Durable blades
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    Smooth lever action
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    Lever extension
  • Other blades sold separately

This cutter from New Star Foodservice rocks a heavy-duty cast iron build and a stylish design. The polished green finish gives it a rustic appeal while the ease of use gives it a restaurant-quality feel. It is a single-blade model, but it’s not without its fair share of accessories.

The stainless steel blades do a fine job whether you’re pushing Yukon gold potatoes or hard sweet potatoes. Minimal force is required to get a potato through end-to-end in one motion. The lever action is consistent and with minimal resistance.

What also helps the easy operation is the presence of high-end suction cups. They are worth every penny for offering a very stable, almost unshakable, device to work with.

The one thing I did not appreciate was the lack of blade grids and pushers. On the other hand, if you don’t have a fondness for wedges or matchstick thin potatoes, you don’t have to buy extra blade and pusher sets.

As always, the footprint should carry some weight in your decision. In the case of this cutter, there’s not a lot to worry about. Although the tool is long enough to accommodate up to 6” long vegetables, it can also be mounted on a wall permanently. That would make it even easier to catch your fries in a bowl.

  • Sharp durable blades
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    Suction feet
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    Wall mounting feature
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    Good capacity
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    Quick lever action
  • Spare blade grids not included

What separates this cutter from others is its design. While it may look unfinished compared to bulkier French fry cutters, this Reliatronic tool also shows that sometimes less is more. The gadget has good enough stability on its own that it doesn’t need the extra weight and detailing.

It comes equipped with 1/2" blades and 3/8” blades, just what you’ll need for making classic French or Belgium fries.

Most of the resistance comes from the suction cup underneath the lever. Unlike in other models, this suction cup is larger and is activated by a pressure lock. This creates a much more reliable seal that will hold the body in place as you push the lever forward.

Speaking of the lever, this one has an extension too. It makes the lever taller and thus easier to use if you’re really tall or if you have a bad back. In a way, you could call this an ideal vegetable cutter for taller than average folk.

Due to a more aerated build, you’ll notice that there’s a large capacity to enjoy. You can put potatoes or other veggies that are 2.9”x2.9” inside. All that without creating unnecessary friction that might hinder the otherwise smooth lever action.

  • Strong stainless steel blades
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    Light body
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    Great suction mechanism
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    Extendable lever
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    Good capacity
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    Two blade grids
  • Cannot be mounted on walls

You don’t need all cutting accessories on the market, but if you want to cover all your bases, then I recommend taking a look at this TigerChef cutter. It has all the blade grids you could ask for, enough even for a small restaurant or fast food joint, let alone for home use.

Although it comes at a slightly higher price point, check out the included accessories: blade grids in sizes 1/4", 3/8”, 1/2", and two grids for 6 or 8 wedges. All you’re missing is something that makes thin potato chips, and you could probably start a business with this cutter.

The blades perform at a very high level. This is a good thing as it means that you’re not just paying for the extra grids and pushers. The lever action seems to have a bit of resistance, just enough to prevent you from smashing potatoes into the blades, but not enough to cause muscle fatigue when cutting pounds of potatoes for one meal.

In terms of stability, there’s not much that will move the cutter. The suction action is just about as good as it gets, especially since each of the four legs has a suction cup attached. The cups are removable, which means that, yes, wall mounting is an option.

Probably the least interesting feature is the cleaning brush. At least until you consider that a permanent wall installation would make cleaning a bit difficult without it.

  • Multiple blade fixtures included
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    Four suction cups
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    Cast iron body
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    Cleaning brush included
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    Fast and reliable cutting
  • Slightly expensive

Small, light, easy to use, and with two sets of sturdy blades – this would generally be enough to describe this ICO cutter. But the fact is that this tiny kitchen tool does a lot more than most people give it credit for.

Given the positioning of the blade grid, it’s actually possible to slip a tray or a plate underneath. That way, you can catch your potatoes and not worry about starch, water, or the potatoes themselves coming in contact with the kitchen board.

Pushing potatoes through seems a bit more reliable. That’s probably because the handle-style lever does a better job at distributing the force equally.

The base is a bit heavier which is good as it adds stability. More stability comes from the wide suction cup which features its own locking mechanism. I’ve seen this offer a superior seal to classic leg suction cups in other models I reviewed.

The two blade grids can cut 3/8” and 1/2" fries without stressing or bending. One thing you shouldn’t do with this machine is cut sweet potatoes. The manufacturer recommends avoiding those. I tend to agree as the blades look much thinner than in similar French fry cutters.

  • Very affordable
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    Two blade grids
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    Stainless steel body
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    Wide suction cup at the base
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    Comfortable handle
  • Thinner blades

This French fry cutter from Meshist is another interesting budget-friendly choice. The design sees an open-frame type body instead of the traditional bulky, covered potato cutter. There are pros and cons to this. One of the good things is that you get some extra capacity out of it.

On the downside, things get messier because the starch and water will drip directly on your countertop as you’re slicing up the potatoes. But everything about making food involves mess, so it’s not a big deal – right? At least starch doesn’t stain.

There are two blade fixtures available. You get a 3/8” and a 1/4” grid. Or, as the manufacturer would put it, one has 36 holes and the other 49 holes. It’s not the most kosher representation, but it seems to fall through the cracks every now and then.

The lever is easy to lower and rise even when you’re using the biggest potato that can fit. Little friction is felt on the sides because of the stainless steel tubes.

  • Sharp blades
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    Two blade grids
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    Stainless steel body
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    Affordable
  • A bit messy

This German-made French fry cutter from Westmark is surprisingly efficient given how little it costs. First of all, it has a very comfortable handle. It features finger indentations which make it easier to grasp, especially by older folk who may be losing grip strength.

The body is not very heavy but seems very sturdy regardless. It’s also backed up by a 5-year warranty, so that should tell you something right there.

Three stainless steel blade fixtures are included. They are ideal for traditional and variations on traditional French fries.

The same, already well-established wide base suction cup is used to give you stability and confidence. Surprisingly enough, the base is made of ABS plastic. And yet, short of banging it with a hammer, it won’t crack.

  • Three blade grids
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    Stainless steel body
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    5-year warranty
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    Affordable
  • Won’t fit very large potatoes

Last but not least, this is another affordable product that I think can give any other on the market a run for its money. TigerChef knows how to churn out quality kitchenware and appliances. The fact that this can be used for cutting sticks and for dicing is already worth the money.

The blade grids feature 25 and 45 holes. They come with their own pushers in order to maintain an even force distribution. In front of the blades, there’s a knife guard. You can use that to dice the sticks coming out with immense precision.

This is even easier to do since there’s no lever action in this French fry cutter. Instead, there’s a smaller handle, not much taller than a blade grid really. This allows you to comfortably position yourself in close proximity to the blades and keep your eye and cutting hand on the action.

There’s not much to say in terms of durability as the build comprises a good mix of stainless steel and ABS plastic.

  • Affordable
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    Knife guide for dicing
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    Stainless steel body
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    Smaller handle
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    No lever
  • Manual dicing

Manual vs. Automatic – The Big Decision

Choosing between a manually operated and an automatic French fry cutter is perhaps the most important decision you’ll have to make. First of all, this will greatly influence the price you have to pay. Automatic cutting machines are great. They’re fast, they can handle large batches, they’re very precise, and they don’t run on elbow grease.

But do you really need one? As great as they are, they make little sense to have if you just eat the occasional French fry side-dish every other weekend. Automatic cutters are best suited for restaurants or fast food joints.

Even if you have regular pool parties and plan on making pounds of fries, a manual machine may still be just as effective as an automatic model.

How Much Do Interchangeable Blades Matter?

If you’re a potato aficionado, you probably love all types of fries. In this case, having access to more than one set of blades may be a make-it-or-break-it feature in a French fry cutter. There’s nothing wrong with that.

In fact, most people tend to buy these kitchen tools because they don’t have the knife skills to cut the potatoes to their desired shape by hand. That being said, think about your budget. Most French fry cutters that let you tackle just about any potato cut out there will be expensive. It won’t matter if they’re automatic or manual cutters.

One option worth considering is to buy the cutter you can afford and then find aftermarket blade sets and pushers that fit your machine. You would be surprised at how many deals there are available and ready for the picking.

Always, Always Look at the Blade Size

The blade set determines what your fries will look like. If you don’t know what each cut is called, you’ll have a hard time navigating the oversaturated market of French fry cutters.

1/4" and 3/8” straight fries are the most common cuts found in fast food stores. They’re straight, long, and extra crunchy. Wedges are very different. You need a lot more blade separation to get four, six, or eight wedges out of a potato.

Then you have to familiarize yourself with other potato cuts such as steak fries, waffle fries, tater tots, crinkle cuts, and so on. Each cut requires a very specific set of blades. The only consolation would be that both classic French fries and Belgian fries are made with the same 1cm thick straight cut.

If you want niche cuts, you have to put extra value on blade diversity over anything else. Just try to keep in mind that, unless you have a quality fryer too and you’re using good oil, you may be wasting time doing all those fancy cuts.

What to Expect from Different Cutter Types?

There are many types of French fry cutters, maybe not as many as there are potato cuts, but still plenty enough. You should know that there are about five universally recognized types of cutters that you might want to consider familiarizing yourself with.

  • Plastic cutters – Plastic cutters are small, flimsy, and require some prep work – peeling and slicing potatoes in half.
  • Crinkle cutters – If you want wrinkly edges, you may need a crinkle cutter. These can be manual, automatic, or semi-automatic.
  • Potato slicers – Everyone knows what a potato slicer looks like. It involves a lot of elbow grease, and you don’t maximize the fries yield, but it’s a reliable solution if you’re on a tight budget.
  • Standard French fry cutters – These work by pushing potatoes through blades instead of dragging them through blades.
  • Heavy-duty cutters – Heavy-duty cutters can be both automatic and manual, though most of them are automatic. They’re what you might call restaurant-quality cutters. They’re powerful, fast, and durable.

Classic Cut or Crinkle Cut, It Doesn’t Really Matter

Even though there are many French fry cutters that come with a single fixture, you can be sure that their manufacturers offer every other type of blade grid to fit your needs. This may make it seem like you have to either search a lot or pay a lot to create a variety of fries at home, but as you can see from this list, it’s not really the case.

My top 10 picks are quite affordable even by the average household standards. Of course, the more you want to do, the more you’ll have to pay. But there are much more expensive and overly complex alternatives out there that don’t necessarily outclass the products on this list. So take your time and then choose whichever style of cutter suits you best.

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